JAIC 2004, Volume 43, Number 2, Article 1 (pp. 129 to 138)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 2004, Volume 43, Number 2, Article 1 (pp. 129 to 138)

USING A PORTABLE SPECTROMETER TO SOURCE ARCHAEOLOGICAL MATERIALS AND TO DETECT RESTORATIONS IN MUSEUM OBJECTS

SARAH U. WISSEMAN, THOMAS E. EMERSON, MARY R. HYNES, & RANDALL E. HUGHES




REFERENCES

Brown, J. A.1996. The Spiro Ceremonial Center: The archaeology of Arkansas Valley Caddoan culture in eastern Oklahoma. Museum of Anthropology Memoir no. 29. 2 vols. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan.

Derrick, M. R., D.Stulik, and J. M.Landry. 1999. Infrared spectroscopy in conservation science. Los Angeles: Getty Conservation Institute.

Emerson, T. E.1989. Water, serpents, and the underworld: An exploration into Cahokian symbolism. In The southern ceremonial complex: Artifacts and analysis: The Cottonlandia Conference, ed. P.Galloway. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. 45–92.

Emerson, T. E., and R. E.Hughes. 2000. Figurines, flint clay sourcing, the Ozark Highlands, and Cahokian acquisition. American Antiquity65:79–101.

Emerson, T. E., and R. E.Hughes. 2001. De-mything the Cahokia catlinite trade. Plains Anthropologist46:149–61.

Emerson, T. E., R. E.Hughes, M. R.Hynes, K. B.Farnsworth, and S. U.Wisseman. 2002. Hopewell catlinite, Tremper mound, and PIMA technology. Paper presented at the 48th Annual Meeting of the Midwest Archaeological Conference in Plenary Session, “Recent Research on Hopewell Collections, OHS: New Ideas, New Techniques,” organized by M. O. Potter, Columbus, Ohio.

Emerson, T. E., R. E.Hughes, M. R.Hynes, and S. U.Wisseman. 2003. The sourcing and interpretation of Cahokia-style figurines in the trans-Mississippi south and southeast. American Antiquity68(2):287–313.

Hamilton, H. W.1952. The Spiro mound. Missouri Archaeologist14:1–276.

Hughes, R. E., T. E.Berres, D. M.Moore, and K. B.Farnsworth. 1998. Revision of Hopewellian trading patterns in midwestern North America based on mineralogical sourcing. Geoarchaeology: An International Journal13:709–29.

Silverman, H., S.Koehler, and S.Wisseman. 1996. Birds on a drum. Urbana, Ill.: Krannert Art Museum.

Wisseman, S. U., D. M.Moore, R. E.Hughes, M. R.Hynes, T. E.Emerson. 2002. Mineralogical approaches to sourcing pipes and figurines from the eastern woodlands, USA. Geoarchaeology: An International Journal17:689–715.



SOURCES OF MATERIALS

Integrated Spectronics Pty Ltd.

A.C.N. 003 873 443 P.O. Box 437 Baulkham Hills, NSW Australia 2153


AUTHOR INFORMATION

SARAH U. WISSEMAN is the director of the Program on Ancient Technologies and Archaeological Materials (ATAM) at the University of Illinois. Her degrees are in classical and near Eastern archaeology, with excavation experience in Israel, Italy, North Carolina, and Nevada. Her research interests include ceramic technology, archaeometry, and Egyptian mummification. Wisseman has curated several exhibits on ceramics and archaeometry at University of Illinois campus museums. Address: ATAM Program, 84a Bevier Hall, 905 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, Ill. 61801

THOMAS E. EMERSON is director of the Illinois Transportation Archaeological Research Program (ITARP) and adjunct professor of anthropology at the University of Illinois. He is a specialist in eastern U.S. archaeology, with primary research interests in the archaeology, religious ideology, and political economy of late prehistoric Mississippian cultures. Emerson has conducted fieldwork throughout the Great Lakes region, the Plains (Missouri Trench), and Norway. Address: ITARP, 209 Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 23 East Stadium Dr., Champaign, Ill. 61820

MARY R. HYNES is an archaeologist with particular interests in ceramic technology and sourcing of ceramic and stone raw materials. Her graduate work was conducted at Southern Illinois University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with fieldwork experience in Chile, Peru, Hawaii, and Illinois. She is currently a part-time editor (ITARP) and PIMA researcher (ATAM). Address as for Emerson

RANDALL E. HUGHES is a retired senior research geologist and section head at the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) at the University of Illinois. His research interests include clay mineralogy, clay minerals associated with coal mines, and the sourcing of archaeological materials using x-ray diffraction and PIMA spectroscopy. Prior to his work at ISGS, Hughes was a research scientist at Thiele Kaolin Company, in Sandersville, Georgia. Address: ISGS, 121 Natural Resources Building, 615 E. Peabody Ave., Champaign, Ill. 61820


Copyright 2004 American Institution for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works