JAIC 2005, Volume 44, Number 1, Article 1 (pp. 01 to 12)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 2005, Volume 44, Number 1, Article 1 (pp. 01 to 12)

OPTICAL BRIGHTENING AGENTS IN PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPER

Paul Messier, Valerie Baas, Diane Tafilowski, & Lauren Varga




REFERENCES

Adams, Ansel.1983. The print. Boston: Little, Brown.

Auer, J.1999. Personal communication. Agfa Consumer Imaging Products, Ridgefield, N. J.

Bevington, P., and K.Robinson. 2002. Data reduction and error analysis for the physical sciences.Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill.

Browning, B. L.1977. Analysis of paper. 2d ed. New York: Marcel Dekker.

Cheek, M.1999. Personal communication. Ciba Specialty Chemical Corp., Basel, Switzerland.

Falkenstein, M.2000. The Hine question. ARTNews99(5): 210–13.

Gray, G.1999. Personal communication. Former papermaker and manager, Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, N. Y.

Kodak Paper Service Division. 1951. The use of fluorescent dyes as brighteners for photographic paper. Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, N. Y.

Krause, P.2003. Personal communication. Former photographic industry executive and currently a photographic consultant and vice president of Imaging Technology/Markets, Yardley, Pa.

Lavédrine, B.1995. Deterioration of some contemporary prints. Topics in photographic preservation. Washington, D. C.: American Institute for Conservation, Photographic Materials Group. 6:106–10.

Murphy, E.2001. Survey of collection: Optical brighteners. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Mustalish, R. A.2000. Optical brighteners: History and technology. Tradition and innovation: Advances in conservation.Postprint of Melbourne Congress. Melbourne, Australia: International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. 133–36.

Valvo, D.1999. Personal communication. Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, N. Y.

Warner, C.1999. Personal communication. Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, N. Y.

Wentzel, F.1960. Memoirs of a photochemist.Philadelphia: American Museum of Photography.

Woodward, R. B.2003. Too much of a good thing: Photography, forgery, and the Lewis Hine scandal. Atlantic Monthly291(5): 67–76.


AUTHOR INFORMATION

PAUL MESSIER received an AB in art history from Vassar College in 1984 and a master of arts degree and certificate of advanced study in paper conservation from the Art Conservation Program, Buffalo State College, in 1990. He is the founder and head conservator of Paul Messier L.L.C., Conservation of Photographs, Works on Paper and Electronic Media. Address: 103 Brooks St., Boston, Mass. 02135

VALERIE BAAS received an MFA in printmaking from Michigan State University in 1976 and an MS in conservation at the Winterthur/University of Delaware Art Conservation Program in 1980. She has been the head of the paper and photographs section of the Conservation Services Laboratory at the Detroit Institute of Arts since 1980. Address: Detroit Institute of Arts, Conservation Services Laboratory, 5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 48202

DIANE TAFILOWSKI received a BFA in fine art from Wayne State University in 1990 and a master of arts degree and certificate of advanced study in paper conservation from the Art Conservation Program, Buffalo State College, in 1997. She is currently employed as a conservator of photographs and works on paper at Paul Messier L.L.C. Address as for Messier

LAUREN VARGA received a BFA in art history from the Massachusetts College of Art in 2001. From 2002 to 2004 she worked as an intern studying paper and photograph conservation at Paul Messier L.L.C. and is currently enrolled in the Art Conservation Program, Buffalo State College. Address as for Messier.


Copyright © 2005 American Institution for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works