JAIC 2005, Volume 44, Number 3, Article 5 (pp. 203 to 215)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 2005, Volume 44, Number 3, Article 5 (pp. 203 to 215)

PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF CONSULTATION WITH COMMUNITIES

JESSICA S. JOHNSON, SUSAN HEALD, KELLY MCHUGH, ELIZABETH BROWN, & MARIAN KAMINITZ




REFERENCES

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AUTHOR INFORMATION

JESSICA S. JOHNSON (Fellow, AIC) is the Senior Objects Conservator for the National Museum of the American Indian. She received an MA in Anthropology with a Certificate in Museum Studies from the University of Arizona in 1986 and a BSc in Archaeological Conservation from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London in 1990. Previously she held the position of Conservator for the Museum Management Program of the National Park Service. From 1989 to 2001, she was the Head of the Gordion Objects Conservation Program for the Gordion Project in Turkey, sponsored by the University Museum at the University of Pennsylvania. She served as Chair of the Objects Specialty Group, 2000–01, and is currently a co-owner of the OSG-L listserv. Address: National Museum of the American Indian, Cultural Resources Center, 4220 Silver Hill Road, Suitland, MD 20470

SUSAN HEALD is the Senior Textile Conservator for the National Museum of the American Indian. She received a BA in Chemistry and Anthropology from the George Washington University in 1985 and an MSc in Conservation from the Winterthur Museum/University of Delaware in 1990. Prior to joining the conservation laboratory at NMAI she was textile conservator at the Minnesota Historical Society. She served as chair and vice-chair for the AIC Textile Specialty Group in 1997-98, and is on the board for the North American Textile Conservation Conference. Address: As for Johnson KELLY MCHUGH is presently a conservator in private practice with Asteya Preservation Group. She was employed as an Objects Conservator for the National Museum of the American Indian since 1998. She received an MA in Art History and a Certificate of Advanced Studies in Art Conservation from New York University in 1999. While in graduate school she worked at the Arizona State Museum and at the Mayan site of Copan on a project associated with the Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education. She spent three years in the Object Conservation Laboratory of the National Gallery of Art prior to entering graduate school. Address: 305 Greenwich Lane, Silver Spring, MD 20910

ELIZABETH BROWN is currently a conservator at the Seattle Art Museum. She was an Objects Conservator for the National Museum of the American Indian in Suitland, Maryland from 2000 to 2004. She received an MA and Certificate of Advanced Studies in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College in 1997. Prior to working at NMAI she was the staff conservator at Mount Vernon from 1998 to 2000. She has also worked in NMAI's New York storage facility and as a fellow at the National Park Service Harpers Ferry Center. Before graduate school she was an intern at the Smithsonian Conservation Analytical Laboratories (now SCMRE) in the furniture department. Address: Conservation Department, Seattle Art Museum, 100 University St., Seattle, WA 98101

MARIAN A. KAMINITZ has held the position of Head of Conservation at the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, since 1991. She received an MS in the Conservation of Artistic and Historic Works from the University of Delaware/Winterthur Museum Program in Art Conservation in 1984. From 1988 to 1998 she was also Adjunct Professor of Conservation at the New York University's Conservation Center. She served as Assistant Conservator in the Anthropology Department at the American Museum of Natural History, New York from 1985 to 1991 and as an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Pacific Regional Conservation Center, Bishop Museum in Honolulu from 1984 to 1985. She is the Coordinator for the Ethnographic Working Group of ICOM-CC. Address: As for Johnson 215


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