JAIC 2002, Volume 41, Number 1, Article 3 (pp. 21 to 42)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 2002, Volume 41, Number 1, Article 3 (pp. 21 to 42)

OLD MASTER RECIPES IN THE 1920s, 1930s, AND 1940s: CURRY, MARSH, DOERNER, AND MAROGER

LANCE MAYER, & GAY MYERS


ABSTRACT—Many American painters of the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s were fascinated by historic painting techniques and by the supposedly lost “secrets” of the Old Masters. Among the most important influences on American artists at that time were Max Doerner's book The Materials of the Artist and the theories and recipes of Jacques Maroger. John Steuart Curry and Reginald Marsh stand out among the artists who absorbed lessons from Doerner and Maroger in that they left behind a large body of material that documents their use of these methods. By studying notebooks, recipes, and letters, as well as test canvases and actual paintings, the authors have been able to establish detailed technical chronologies for Curry and Marsh. The research also provides insights into how these kinds of experimental methods have affected the state of preservation of paintings, not only by Curry and Marsh but by other painters whose techniques are less well documented.
[Spanish Abstract] [French Abstract]

Article Sections:

1. INTRODUCTION
2. JOHN STEUART CURRY
3. WILLIAM MCCLOY
4. REGINALD MARSH
5. DIVERGING PATHS OF MARSH AND CURRY
6. TEST CANVASES
7. THE 1940S AND BEYOND
a: References , Author Information
Entire Article

Copyright 2002 American Institution for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works